Kayihura a victim of Museveni’s tribal machinations, analysts

Several reports in broadcast and print media have said former Uganda Police Chief, Gen. Kale Kayihura at first was a good officer and a gentleman. The reports claim Kayihura’s problems only began when Museveni brought him close, promoted him and made him inspector general of police. The moment that happened, say Kampala analysts, the stage was set for the general’s eventual downfall.

Museveni would use him in all his plots, evil or otherwise, and that would attract the jealousy of some Ugandans of the powerful Bahima ethnicity. Kale Kayihura therefore could have fallen afoul of President Museveni for reasons that have nothing to do with allegations against him of “planning to cause insecurity.”

There is an intense succession struggle behind the scenes, with prominent members of Museveni’s Bahima that are determined to keep power within themselves “for eternity”. Someone like Kayihura who is “an outsider”, a member of the Bafumbira people of the Kisoro region was in trouble from the word go.

It is an open secret in Uganda that senior Bahima have been undermining other people and Kayihura only is the latest high-profile victim. If Kayihura was trying to do a good job, someone like his former boss, Minister for Security Henry Tumukunde, a senior Muhima, was not going to allow it. It got to the extent that the wrangles were spilling out in public.

“The head of Police, and the Minister for Security General Henry Tumukunde are busy fighting, to show who has more power and control,” said MP Winnie Kiiza, the leader of the opposition in Uganda’s parliament. The Kasese woman Member of Parliament was commenting on the spate of security incidents cropping up all over Uganda as a result of Kayihura not being left alone to do his appointed duties.

As Museveni grows weaker and loses control “the big beasts are circling in,” commented a Ugandan analyst. “And none of the beasts are bigger than the Bahima, they are in charge of the jungle!” added the astute analyst.

According to George Orwell in Animal Farm, some animals in the famous fable took to saying they were “more equal” than others. It had begun with the animals liberating themselves from oppressive humans. But as time went on, the poor animals realized the oppressor was the pigs, and the pigs no longer saw themselves as equal to the other creatures.

Nothing can be more analogous about the Ugandan situation today than that fable.

Mr. Museveni no doubt has created that tribal situation whereby his ethnicity has developed a sense of entitlement that power, and there control of national resources is theirs, with all the country’s other peoples battling for crumbs.

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